Dog Works Radio presents: Blanket ID

August 2, 2011

Martin Hubbard of Blanket ID joins hosts Robert and Michele Forto on Dog Works Radio August 7, 2011 at 2 p.m. Eastern

Denver, CO–July 29, 2011–The owner of Blanket ID, Martin Hubbard joins Dog Works Radio with hosts Robert and Michele Forto.

Callers are welcome to join the conversation during the show by calling (646)727-3839. The live, Internet talk-radio show will stream in from the host page at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/dogworks.

“Doing good in your neighborhood,” said Robert, host of the program. “Blanket ID’s program is amazing! Not only will their product and system help find your pet if it is lost but the company is the a true ambassador to the pet community.”

An archive will be available at the same link immediately following the show or listeners can subscribe to the archives via RSS feed located on the host page. Read more about the host and the discussion on RobertForto.com.

About Blanket ID

At Blanket ID they aim to be the go to source for an online community to support animal welfare. With their proven system, this is the only pet identification you will ever need. No need to buy a new tag if you move or change your cell phone number.

In addition to providing a great looking ID tag for your pet, Blanket ID delivers a seriously effective solution to the problem of losing a pet. Regardless of how your pet gets lost, Blanket ID strives to make sure that they get home safely and quickly.

The company works closely with all animal charities and we welcome approaches from organizations that could use our help. Every ID tag and membership purchased generates money for animal causes and we all greatly enjoy being able to help.

Visit Blanket ID on the web at http://www.blanketid.com

About Dog Works Radio

Dog Works Radio is an interactive, live Internet talk-radio show that focuses on canines sports, working dogs and training. Hosts Robert and Michele Forto explore the advice, training tips, information and personality that is so unique to those who chose to work with dogs as a lifestyle, not a career. Callers are encouraged to call (646)727-3839 to listen or ask questions. The stream and achieves are available at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/dogworks. The show is live every Sunday at 12 noon Mountain/ 2 p.m. E.T. The show is hosted hosted in Alaska and Colorado and brought to you by Denver Dog Works and Twine Group Media.

 ###

Press Contact

Michele Forto

(303)578-9881

live@dogworksradio.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

RoboCop K-9

May 5, 2011

Have you heard the news!  You can equip your dog with high tech gadgetry. Your dog can be outfitted for gear like an infrared headlamp for night vision, an ear radio (Bluetooth) so you can communicate commands to him remotely, protective armor for shrapnel and the best gadget yet, titanium teeth.

This is a misconception! There have been lots of rumors started lately by the media reporting that the military and police k-9’s are being outfitted with Titanium teeth.  My research found this to be untrue.  That being said, this picture has surfaced since the recent news of Bin Laden’s death.

The Belgian Malinois in the photo above appears to have Titanium canines – these apparently cost $2000 per tooth.  Now I know several people who will do anything for their dogs – but this is extreme.

[Read More: Mystery Dog at bin Laden Compound Creates Buzz]

The media reports that these teeth can pierce armor and cause horrific damage.  Well I can speak from experience and a dog with his original canines can inflict some horrific damage as well.  A few years ago while working with a police dog I was attacked and suffered several bites, bruises, and 4 broken ribs.

__________________

Michele Forto is the lead trainer at Denver Dog Works and the co-host of the popular Dog Works Radio Show


Dog Works Radio: Pit Bulls as Service Dogs? Not in Denver

December 13, 2010

Pit Bulls as Service Dogs?

On the latest edition of the Dog Works Radio we spoke to an expert in ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act) policy in Denver, Candice Adler about the recent ruling to not allow Pit Bulls as service dogs in Denver.

Pit Bulls as service dogs will be not allowed in the City and County of Denver, CO in a landmark ruling last week. The City Council turned down down an amendment to the decade long breed ban that includes Pit Bulls. A suit was brought forth by a US Solider to be allowed to keep his pit bull as a service dog. The Department of Justice announced this summer that new rules will be in place this coming March. The City of Denver said it doesn’t care and they are not making exceptions. A suit is in the works…

The Dog Works Radio Show is hosted by well respected canine behaviorist, Dr. Robert Forto and is brought to you by Twine Group Media and Dog Works Training Centers. The Dig Doctor Radio Show demonstrates through guests, call-ins, chats and social media how dog owners can have a balanced relationship with their dogs.

Listen to the latest show here:

Dog Works Radio: Pit Bulls as Service Dogs? Not in Denver

We welcome your comments suggestions and concerns. Please comment below or send them to live@dogdoctorradio.com

[ Rewind: Mush You Huskies: Ballad of the Northland ]

[ Rewind: Dog Works Radio: Atticus the Wolfdog of a US Solider ]

_______________

Dr. Robert Forto is a canine behaviorist and the training director for Dog Works Training Centers. Dr. Forto is a musher currently in Alaska training for his first Iditarod under the Team Ineka banner and the host of the popular programs, Dog Works Radio and Mush! You Huskies.

 


Part time dogs in a full time world

October 28, 2010

Robert Forto

At Denver Dog Works we train people how to become dog trainers. We train them to become the best dog trainers in the world in my opinion, and in doing so we teach our students how to think outside the box and defend their position on a variety of topics. This past week we were discussing Dog Law and I asked my students to search for an interesting story with a legal angle in regards to dogs. One of my students, Christena Pastoor, found an interesting article on renting dogs and we talked about it for the whole three hour session. I found it such an intriguing concept as did everyone in the room. I even posted the question on the social networking sites Facebook and Twitter and got an overwhelming response. So I decided it write about it on my blog and talk about it on my radio show this week, The Dog Doctor Radio Show heard weekly onwww.blogtalkradio.com/dogworks. I welcome your feedback and your comments because this is a topic that is worth exploring.

There was an article written in September by Kathy McManus on the Internet that has really peaked my interest. It was titled: Renting a Dog Barking Up the Wrong Tree? about a service that is offered in New York City, Los Angeles and London where you can “rent” a dog. Yes folk, renting your best…err…temporary friend. You can lease them by the day from a company called Flexpet.

While this is not a new concept as upscale hotels have lent dogs to guests over the years, Flexpet is making a business out of renting dogs. It is not cheap either. According to the company’s website there is a $99.00 administration charge, a $99.00 monthly membership fee, a mandatory $150.00 training fee and orientation lesson and then the customer can rent as many dog day afternoons as desired for a $45.00 fee for day.

Flexpet says that all of their dogs-many of which are from animal shelters-wear GPS tracking collars with temperature sensors and feed “holistic dog food” and all have stable temperaments and between two and five years old. But of course there are many critics over this practice as they see it as promotion of dogs as accessories. If you are a frequent listener of The Dog Doctor Radio Show we often talk about what we call “Paris Hilton Dogs” the small dogs that are carried in purses and adorned with bejeweled collars-of course no disrespect to Ms. Hilton-we see these dogs as more of a fashion accessory than a pet. I mean when did we decide as a society that we should carry our dogs around in handbags? What would our forbearers think from 20,000 years ago when we first added dogs to our lives?

Flexpet is not without controversy of course. The company is banned in Boston after the City Council passed an ordinance making dog letting illegal. “To rent a dog just seems wrong,” said one legislator. “I’m not for legislating morality, but it just seems like cruel and unusual treatment of a poor, defenseless animal.” In the editorial pages in Boston they took issue with what they saw as people “who want the comfort of a pet, but not the full-time responsibility.”

So just who rents a pet? I would assume people that travel a lot, people who live in apartment buildings or high-rises or places that do not allow pets, people that have family members who may not like dogs in the house or people like Sarah Stevenson who moved from the U.K. to New York. “It’s been difficult for me to meet people because everyone in New York just kind of goes about their business,” Stevenson lamented. But when she is out walking a rented pooch named Oliver, “It becomes a nice way to meet people.”

My trainer, Christena Pastoor had plenty to say about this subject. “In terms of legality I can see how municipalities would allow a dog rental business to operate as long as the company can sufficiently prove quality care of their dogs while at their facility and through a screening process of the renters and their homes.” Mrs. Pastoor, who researched Flexpet thoroughly for her project on Dog Law also said, “According to their (Flexpet) website , they provide vet checks every three months, fit every dog with a GPS collar and require all renters to attend mandatory training sessions before taking a dog.”

Of course there are other concerns than the legal ones. Dogs are pack animals that thrive on routine and security. Renting dogs to any number of people for short periods of time does not provide the consistency that they need to thrive. While Flexpet asserts that these dogs do not live in kennels and they stay with a primary caregiver when not being “rented” there is still a constant flux with different dogs at “home” and ever-changing renters. Dogs can become stressed when they do not have a consistent environment and behavior problems are likely to ensue.

According to Mrs. Pastoor, putting a cash value on time spent with a dog automatically makes the dog a commodity in the eye of the renter. It also creates the risk of the dog simply being viewed as an accessory. Dogs are living beings and should be valued as such, not as an accessory that makes people more noticeable.

Of course, many people cannot take the care of a dog on full-time, however there are many other positive outlets for fulfilling a person’s desire for canine companionship. Shelters and rescue organizations are in desperate need for people to walk dogs and spend time socializing them. All dogs in shelters can benefit dramatically from socialization, which may in turn help then find a new home. Fostering a dog is also an option. Many, if not all, shelters are filled to capacity and of course fostering takes a greater time commitment than renting, but it is not a “permanent dog”. Or if a person cannot find time to volunteer to foster, or work at a shelter, maybe they could find friends or neighbors who would be willing to have them spend quality time with their dog that they might not be able to give themselves. As you may know that the number one cause of behavior problems in dogs in lack of exercise and positive stimulation and that is why most dogs end up in a shelter situation in the first place.

I have a little bit of a different spin on it. Of course I love dogs. They are my passion and my livelihood and I cannot understand just how this business of renting dogs is not only morally irresponsible but financially irresponsible as well, but what about people that volunteer for programs such as Big Brothers or Big Sisters? I am sure they do that to “give back” or to enrich a young child’s life. But doesn’t that work the same if you are “renting” a dog? Also what about dogs that suffer from what I call “kennel craziness”, that is dogs that are in a kennel situation and through lack of positive stimulation or people contact begin to pace and bark and spin, very similar to people in correctional institutions. Even a psychologist counters that people that want to borrow a dog usually just want some companionship. “It may be a short bond,” he said, “but it’s a real bond.”

What do you think? Should people rent dogs? Written in conjunction with Christena Pastoor, Student at Denver Dog Works

Citation: Katy McManus’ 9/24/09 article: Renting a Dog: Barking Up the Wrong Tree?

Tags: Robert FortoMichele FortoIditarodTeam InekaDog Training Denver Dog Doctor RadioDenver Dog Works Mushing Radio | Animal law | Dog Law

__________________________

Dr. Robert Forto is the training director for Denver Dog Works and The Ineka Project in Colorado. Dr. Forto also hosts The Dog Doctor Radio Show weekly from his training center. Dr. Forto can be reached through his website athttp://www.denverdogworks.com

 


The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Growl class and organ donation

October 18, 2010

The Dog Doctor Radio Show

On the latest edition of the Dog Doctor Radio Show we spoke about our Growl Class that we are bringing back by popular demand to our flagship location, Denver Dog Works. Our Growl Class is like no other group class in the country. We bring a bunch of aggressive dogs together and we as the human part of the dog/human relationship learn how to work through the problems. It sounds like chaos right? No, its actually very controlled and you will learn a lot.

[ Rewind: The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Cowboy and Wills ]

We also spoke about organ donation. I know, this is not a dog topic. But it is! We have been given the opportunity to train two family’s dogs (the donor and the recipient) while they go through a kidney transplant procedure. We are happy to be a part of the team.

Check out their blog about their kidney donation experience. I warn you: these ladies have tremendous courage and good story teller’s too!

GottaGetaKidney Blog

The Dog Doctor Radio Show is hosted by well respected canine behaviorist, Dr. Robert Forto and is brought to you by Twine Group Media and Dog Works Training Centers. The Dig Doctor Radio Show demonstrates through guests, call-ins, chats and social media how dog owners can have a balanced relationship with their dogs.

Listen to the latest show here:

The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Growl Class and Organ Donation

We welcome your comments suggestions and concerns. Please comment below or send them to live@dogdoctorradio.com

_______________

Dr. Robert Forto is a canine behaviorist and the training director for Dog Works Training Centers. Dr. Forto is a musher currently in Alaska training for his first Iditarod under the Team Ineka banner and the host of the popular programs, The Dog Doctor Radio Show and Mush! You Huskies.

 


The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Michele is Back!

October 11, 2010

 

The Dog Doctor Radio Show

 

On the latest edition of the Dog Doctor Radio Show we brought our beloved co-host Michele back! It has been about three months since we did a show together. Now that we have the technical bugs worked out we can now host the show together every week 3200 miles apart. Listen to the show and let me know what you think.

The Dog Doctor Radio Show is hosted by well respected canine behaviorist, Dr. Robert Forto and is brought to you by Twine Group Media and Dog Works Training Centers. The Dig Doctor Radio Show demonstrates through guests, call-ins, chats and social media how dog owners can have a balanced relationship with their dogs.

Listen to the latest show here:

The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Michele is Back!

We welcome your comments suggestions and concerns. Please comment below or send them to live@dogdoctorradio.com

<!–9772cde34f9e4e9b9980baff28a9e8a3–>

_______________

Dr. Robert Forto is a canine behaviorist and the training director for Dog Works Training Centers. Dr. Forto is a musher currently in Alaska training for his first Iditarod under the Team Ineka banner and the host of the popular programs, The Dog Doctor Radio Show and Mush! You Huskies.


The Best of The Dog Doctor Radio Show: Raw Diets and Dogs with leah Morse

October 4, 2010

On the latest edition of the Dog Doctor Radio Show we interviewed good friend, fellow dog trainer and breeder of World Class Boxers, Leah Morse. Leah is a graduate of our canine obedience trainer instructors program and is quickly becoming an expert of feeding raw diets to dogs.

The Dog Doctor Radio Show is hosted by well respected canine behaviorist, Dr. Robert Forto and is brought to you by Twine Group Media and Dog Works Training Centers. The Dig Doctor Radio Show demonstrates through guests, call-ins, chats and social media how dog owners can have a balanced relationship with their dogs.

Listen to the latest show here:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/dogworks/2010/10/04/the-dog-doctor-radio-show-raw-diets-and-dogs

We welcome your comments suggestions and concerns. Please comment below or send them to live@dogdoctorradio.com

<!–bc33ea274a28436a8aaba8d62a326fe3–>

Dr. Robert Forto is a canine behaviorist and the training director for Dog Works Training Centers. Dr. Forto is a musher currently in Alaska training for his first Iditarod under the Team Ineka banner and the host of the popular programs, The Dog Doctor Radio Show and Mush! You Huskies.